Personal Independence Payments

pipimgFrom 8 April 2013 Personal Independence Payment (PIP) will replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for people aged 16 to 64 with a health condition or disability. PIP helps with some of the extra costs caused by ill-health or a disability. What you’ll get is not based on your condition but on how your conditions affects you. You may need an assessment to work out the level of help you get. Your needs will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support. People under 16 or over 65 won’t normally be affected by PIP and most people getting DLA won’t be affected until 2015.

What you’ll get

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is paid every 4 weeks and is tax free and can be paid if you are in or out of work. It is made up of 2 components (parts). Whether you get 1 or both of these depends on how your conditions affects you.

Daily living component

Daily living component Weekly rate
Standard £53.00
Enhanced £79.15

Mobility component

Mobility component Weekly rate
Standard £21.00
Enhanced £55.25

You may need an assessment to work out the level of help you’ll get.

Your needs will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support.

How you’re paid

All benefits, pension and allowances are paid into an account, e.g. your bank account.

Eligibility

To qualify for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) you must be aged 16 to 64 on 8 April 2013 and have difficulty with:

You must have had these difficulties for 3 months and expect them to last for at least 9 months.

Terminal illness

You may also qualify if you’re terminally ill (not expected to live more than 6 months).

Daily living difficulties

You may get the daily living component of PIP if you need help with things like:

Mobility difficulties

You may get the mobility component of PIP if you need help with going out and moving around.

Contact a local support organisation to get help understanding PIP.

Health assessments

You may get a letter telling you to go for an assessment to work out the level of help you need. The letter explains why and where you must go.

DWP will make the decision about your benefit, the assessment just makes recommendations.

What you need to do

You don’t need to contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) about this now, even if you get Disability Living Allowance (DLA) at the moment.

If you currently get DLA

Most people currently claiming DLA won’t be affected before 2015.

If your condition changes, or you reach the end of your existing DLA award then you may be affected earlier.

Even if you get an indefinite or lifetime award of DLA, you’ll have to apply for PIP when asked.

You’ll get a letter early in 2013 to tell you:

If you apply for PIP, your DLA will continue until DWP makes a decision about your claim. If you decide not to apply, your DLA will end.

Turning 16 or 65

The change from DLA to PIP only affects people aged 16 to 64.

If you receive DLA and you’ll reach 65 after 8 April 2013, you won’t be contacted until 2015 at the earliest, unless the effect of your health condition or disability changes before then.

Children who get DLA and who will turn 16 on or after 7 October 2013 will need to decide if they want to claim PIP. If this affects your child, you’ll get a letter letting you know when and how to apply.

New claims

PIP will be introduced for new claims in parts of the north of England from 8 April 2013, and nationwide from 10 June 2013.

You’ll have to phone DWP to make a new claim. They’ll then send you a form asking you to describe how your long-term health condition or disability affects you.

You may need to go to an assessment to work out the level of help you need.

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